What is taro clobetasol propionate cream used for

For Atopic Dermatitis: "My dyshidrotic eczema has been fairly constant for the past decade. Prior it was caused by food prep (was a cook), now it just is for no apparent reason. I have used betamethazone and cordran tape, with limited results. Dyshidrotic eczema requires strong medicine. My condition gets pretty chronic with peeling dry patches that often have persistent painful cracking. Within a couple of weeks of intentional use, the condition gets much better. It never goes completely away, but is much more manageable. I apply at night most days, if it has a flare up, then several times a day. I'm not sure of all of the different ways you can get clobetasol, but I use ointment. If you need a medicine this strong, be thankful it exists! It gets it done!"

In clinical studies, carbamazepine suspension, conventional tablets, and extended-release tablets delivered equivalent amounts of drug to the systemic circulation. However, it has been observed that the suspension is somewhat faster absorbed. Furthermore, the extended-release tablet is slightly slower than the conventional tablet. The bioavailability of the extended-release tablet is 89%, compared to the suspension. Plasma levels of carbamazepine are variable. The time to peak concentration for the different formulations are as follows: Suspension = hours; Conventional tablets = 4-5 hours; Extended-release tablets = 3-12 hours.

What is taro clobetasol propionate cream used for

what is taro clobetasol propionate cream used for

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